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Held at our Hacker Garage on Saturday July 15, 2017.

Our programming is getting FANCIER: This meeting will start our Collaborative Sketch project! Draw with one or more friends! In this project we’ll be combining HTML, p5.js, Firebase, and jQuery to create a collaborative sketchpad. We’ll use p5.js to manipulate the drawing space, Firebase to keep track of our drawing in terms of points that we’ve marked in our drawing, and jQuery to easily manipulate HTML elements.

Hack Club Logo

It's Sumobot fighting time!!

Originally posted for Facebook, this shows the simplebot using the Captain Arguino Arduino board from www.podpi.com being controlled via AJFisher's UDP transparent bridge to Johnny-five over Adafruit Industries' ESP8266 "Huzzah" development board.

This design was adapted from Andrew Fisher's article in Make: JavaScript Robotics by Rick Waldron & Backstop Media.

I control the bot using W, A, S, D.

At our club, we have two separate programming tracks:

One is Hack Club, which is targeted at High School kids, and Google's CS-First for elementary and middle-school kids.  Any kid can do any of the tracks at our club.

The CS-First program includes some very great video-driven, instructor supported tutorials on how to create programs using MIT's Scratch programming environment.

We are currently using the Storytelling Theme and will be doing Game Design in the summer.

Let us know if you'd like to join us, by filling out the Contact Us form: http://www.thecomputerclub.org/contact/

Great Article from Comstock's Magazine about PodPi, the curriculum that we are primarily using for our electronics track:

screen-shot-2016-10-17-at-3-09-22-pm

http://www.comstocksmag.com/web-only/can-comic-book-teach-children-about-stem

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Hi Club Members!

This is one way to build the replacement gauge for Servo's Dashboard.

Please ensure that you have the appropriate materials before you start this challenge.  Materials such as: Scissors, x acto knife, glue/cement, some cardboard or plastic and either some colored pens/pencils or a color printer and some software will be helpful.  I used Microsoft Excel and a color printer for this, but you can use anything you like!

The sensing temperature experiment is pretty fun. The 1k thermistor is the larger of the two packages, in case you were wondering.

So, were you able to make a solution for changing the color of an RGB LED when you squeeze the thermistor to warm it up?

I'd like to see it. Here's the solution I came up with:

Screen Shot 2016-07-18 at 6.52.46 PM

Screen Shot 2016-07-17 at 8.31.42 PM

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